Teranesia

  • : Function ereg() is deprecated in /home/thebigcr/public_html/scifidorks/includes/file.inc on line 646.
  • : Function ereg() is deprecated in /home/thebigcr/public_html/scifidorks/includes/file.inc on line 646.
  • : Function ereg() is deprecated in /home/thebigcr/public_html/scifidorks/includes/file.inc on line 646.
  • : Function ereg() is deprecated in /home/thebigcr/public_html/scifidorks/includes/file.inc on line 646.
  • : Function ereg() is deprecated in /home/thebigcr/public_html/scifidorks/includes/file.inc on line 646.
  • : Function ereg() is deprecated in /home/thebigcr/public_html/scifidorks/includes/file.inc on line 646.
  • : Function ereg() is deprecated in /home/thebigcr/public_html/scifidorks/includes/file.inc on line 646.
  • : Function ereg() is deprecated in /home/thebigcr/public_html/scifidorks/includes/file.inc on line 646.
teranesia.jpg

Greg Egan

GENRES:
Hard Sci-Fi

SUMMARY:
On Earth in the near future, biologists are working to shed light on the mysterious evolutionary anomalies that begin cropping up on the islands of the Indonesian archipelago. Among their number, the central character, Prabir, does his best to protect his sister Madhusree from the history that ties them to the region.

RESPONSE:
The motivations that propel Prabir, the threat posed to his life, the safety of his sister, and the salvation she provides would have been couched as a tale of redemption in the hands of a more romantic author. Greg Egan makes it a tale of survival, matching the plot to the raw evolutionary concepts with which the characters are concerned.

Teranesia is evolutionary science fiction, and Greg Egan shows he is as capable a writer in this genre as he is when dealing with physics. I enjoy his physics-focussed books, but I have to concentrate hard to read them, and I sometimes have no idea where the boundary lies between what is currently understood and what he has made up. Coming from a biology background, I could see that boundary in this book but had no trouble accepting the new concepts he posited to drive the story, as they were well thought out and provided scope for an exciting and compelling tale.

I think setting the story close to the current era allowed the author to use humour more often than the removed social contexts allowed in their other books (Incandescence, Diaspora). There were parts set in Canada that had me laughing out loud.

I have found Greg Egan’s characters easy to empathize with before, but following Prabir and Madhusree through the trials of their youth made their adult selves very familiar and likeable. The most emotional moments were written with enough heart to draw emotions from the reader, but without the schmaltz that would have made reading them a chore.

I was reminded of the post-catastrophe novels of John Wyndham, as the key challenges faced by the characters are never fully explained. The author simply sets the parameters of the changes that take the story beyond our experience and writes about how the characters deal with what occurs.

POINT BLANK:
An engaging and thought-provoking tale of survival with some interesting evolutionary concepts thrown in

Reviewed by Worldslaziestbusker

Evolutionary sci-fi

Wow, looks like we have a new sub-sub genre - evolutionary science fiction!

Well, there's now at least two books on here that fit this description: Evolution's Shore and this one. That's enough for a sub-sub genre, isn't it?