The Salmon of Doubt

  • : Function ereg() is deprecated in /home/thebigcr/public_html/scifidorks/includes/file.inc on line 646.
  • : Function ereg() is deprecated in /home/thebigcr/public_html/scifidorks/includes/file.inc on line 646.
  • : Function ereg() is deprecated in /home/thebigcr/public_html/scifidorks/includes/file.inc on line 646.
  • : Function ereg() is deprecated in /home/thebigcr/public_html/scifidorks/includes/file.inc on line 646.
  • : Function ereg() is deprecated in /home/thebigcr/public_html/scifidorks/includes/file.inc on line 646.
  • : Function ereg() is deprecated in /home/thebigcr/public_html/scifidorks/includes/file.inc on line 646.
  • : Function ereg() is deprecated in /home/thebigcr/public_html/scifidorks/includes/file.inc on line 646.
  • : Function ereg() is deprecated in /home/thebigcr/public_html/scifidorks/includes/file.inc on line 646.
salmon.jpg

Douglas Adams

GENRES:
Sci-fi, Fantasy, Humour, Satire, Essay

SUMMARY:
Published after Douglas Adams' death, The Salmon of Doubt consists of an introduction by Stephen Fry (different in international versions), a lot of material trawled from the author’s computer (letters, essays, interviews and short stories), and Adams' final unfinished Dirk Gently novel.

RESPONSE:
In a previous book review I stated that I wasn’t interested in reading Douglas Adams’ unfinished Dirk Gently novel, but my mind was changed when my brother-in-law sent me a copy and encouraged me to give at least the peripheral articles a go. This material is interesting without seeming voyeuristic in the way posthumously published works can sometimes seem. Two short stories, written for Comic Relief, tie in to the Hitchhikers universe, and many of the interviews discuss the various attempts to make a film of the book of the radio series.

Stephen Fry wrote an introduction to the collection, praising Douglas Adams’ skills as an author. This mirrored the introduction Adams wrote for “Sunset at Blandings,” P.G. Wodehouse’s unfinished novel. Reading about his admiration for Wodehouse’s skills as a wordsmith and realizing Adams was enthusiastic about the unfinished work of another of my favourite authors further encouraged me to bite the bullet and read his own unfinished work. It also set me musing who might write the introduction to Stephen Fry’s unfinished work should he die with a novel on the go.

“The Salmon of Doubt” component of the book was short. It was exciting to be part of Dirk Gently’s world again, and the bones of another complex plot of apparently unconnected components was under construction when the book petered out. The concerns I’d had about the frustration I’d feel over the unresolved story were justified. I woke up the next day looking forward to reading more of the story, and the realization that I would never find out what the rhinoceros was up to, what the stolen car signified and how they linked to Dave the future kangaroo was disappointing on a level I hadn’t anticipated. It was easy to be selfish and wish for more from someone who brought me so much joy, but we’re lucky to have the seven complete novels Douglas Adams wrote. I don’t regret reading the unfinished work but probably won’t revisit it in the same way I do Douglas Adams’ other works for fear of melting my brain with the effort of trying to link the various elements he threw into the mix.


Reviewed by Worldslaziestbusker